Excellent Hair Fall Treatment
Search: Look for:   Last 1 Month   Last 6 Months   All time

How bacteria resist 'Trojan horse' antibiotic

Washington, Tue, 20 Mar 2012 ANI

Washington, March 20 (ANI): Indian origin scientists have discovered the mechanism by which some bacteria evade a potent antibiotic.

 

The researchers found that the bacteria have modified a common "housekeeping" enzyme in a way that enables the enzyme to recognize and disarm the antibiotic.

 

Bacteria often engage in chemical warfare with one another, and many antibiotics used in medicine are modelled on the weapons they produce. But microbes also must protect themselves from their own toxins. The defences they employ for protection can be acquired by other species, leading to antibiotic resistance.

 

The researchers focused on an enzyme, known as MccF, that they knew could disable a potent "Trojan horse" antibiotic that sneaks into cells disguised as a tasty protein meal. The bacterial antibiotic, called microcin C7 (McC7) is similar to a class of drugs used to treat bacterial infections of the skin.

 

"How Trojan horse antibiotics work is that the antibiotic portion is coupled to something that's fairly innocuous - in this case it's a peptide. So susceptible bacteria see this peptide, think of it as food and internalize it," said University of Illinois biochemistry professor Satish Nair, who led the study.

 

The meal comes at a price, however: Once the bacterial enzymes chew up the amino acid disguise, the liberated antibiotic is free to attack a key component of protein synthesis in the bacterium, Nair explained.

 

"That is why the organisms that make this thing have to protect themselves," he said.

 

In previous studies, researchers had found the genes that protect some bacteria from this class of antibiotic toxins, but they didn't know how they worked. These genes code for peptidases, which normally chew up proteins (polypeptides) and lack the ability to recognize anything else.

 

Before the new study, "it wasn't clear how a peptidase could destroy an antibiotic," Nair said.

 

To get a fuller picture of the structure of the peptidase, Illinois graduate student Vinayak Agarwal crystallized MccF while it was bound to other molecules, including the antibiotic.

 

An analysis of the structure and its interaction with the antibiotic revealed that MccF looked a lot like other enzymes in its family, but with a twist - or, rather, a loop. Somehow MccF has picked up an additional loop of amino acids that it uses to recognize the antibiotic, rendering it ineffective.

 

"Now we know that specific amino acid residues in this loop are responsible for making this from a normal housekeeping gene into something that's capable of degrading this class of antibiotics," Nair stated.

 

With this information, researchers - and eventually, doctors and other clinicians - will be able to scan the genomes of disease-causing bacteria to find out which ones have genes with the antibiotic-resistance loop in them, Nair said.

 

"If we know what type of bacteria are causing an infection we know what kind of antibiotic to give and what kind not to give," he noted.

 

The finding was reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (ANI)

 


LATEST IMAGES
King of Bhutan, the Bhutan Queen and Crown Prince meeting the PM Modi
PM Narendra Modi welcomes the King of Bhutan
PM Modi paying tributes at the portrait of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel
People take part in the Run For Unity on the Rashtriya Ekta Diwas
PM Modi flagging off the Run For Unity on the Rashtriya Ekta Diwas
Post comments:
Your Name (*) :
Your Email :
Your Phone :
Your Comment (*):
  Reload Image
 
 

Comments:


 

OTHER TOP STORIES


Excellent Hair Fall Treatment
Careers | Privacy Policy | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us | | Latest News
Copyright © 2015 NEWS TRACK India All rights reserved.