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Key regulator protein for kidney disease identified

Washington, Mon, 12 Mar 2012 ANI
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Washington, Mar 12 (ANI): A regulator protein has been identified that plays a crucial role in kidney fibrosis, a condition that leads to kidney failure.

 

The research team led by John Cijiang He, MD, PhD, Professor of Nephrology and Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics and Avi Ma'ayan, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, studied three mouse models of kidney fibrosis.

 

One group of mice contained HIV viral proteins incorporated into their genome; the second group was injected with a high dose of folic acid; in the third mouse model, kidney filtration was blocked in one kidney. All of these factors cause kidney fibrosis.

 

The researchers gathered the genetic material of the mice and compared it to the genetic material of mice that did not have kidney fibrosis. Using a new computational systems biology algorithm and software called Expression2Kinases - developed by the Ma'ayan Laboratory at Mount Sinai - the results from these experiments were analyzed.

 

They found that HIPK2, a protein kinase, or regulator, was highly active in the mice with kidney fibrosis. HIPK2 regulates the way certain genes are expressed and when HIPK2 is highly active this leads to kidney fibrosis. Drs He and Ma'ayan also found that when they eliminated HIPK2, fibrosis was less prominent and the condition of the mice significantly improved.

 

"Our findings have important implications for people with kidney diseases, patients I treat every day," said Dr He.

 

"Protein kinases like HIPK2 are highly effective therapeutic targets. We look forward to exploring this further," he added.

 

Now, Mount Sinai scientists can work to develop a drug intervention that inhibits the activity of HIPK2.

 

"This study is an important example of the translational research we are doing at Mount Sinai.

 

"Using algorithms and software developed here, we worked with Dr He, who is a kidney disease physician and scientist, to better understand what causes kidney fibrosis, and we are now one step closer to finding a therapeutic solution to a complex disease that affects millions of Americans," said Dr Ma'ayan.

 

The research is published in the March 11 issue of Nature Medicine. (ANI)

 

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